“Second Decade” history podcast, Episode 2: Barbados Vault and the Dead Tea Woman.

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If things had been normal this week, this post would have gone up no later than Monday. The election of 2016–about which I was spectacularly and heartbreakingly wrong–has sucked all the oxygen out of nearly everything, but there is a new episode of the Second Decade podcast, Episode 2, up right now.

Second Decade is on iTunes, here; it’s on TuneIn, here; you can access it directly on the Libsyn page for it, here; or, perhaps the easiest way, click this link for an embedded player that will open in your browser.

Episode 2: Barbados Vault and the Dead Tea Woman investigates two mysterious tales from Caribbean islands during the 1810s, one quite famous, the other almost unknown. You may have heard the “moving coffins of the Chase Vault” story referred to in paranormal-related media–supposedly between 1812 and 1820 several heavy coffins contained in a burial vault on the island of Barbados were found to have moved about by mysterious means, with no signs of access or manipulation. Was it voodoo? The second mystery, from Nevis, involves a body that washed up on a beach in a very unusual container. I profiled that case years ago on this blog, here, but the Second Decade treatment involves an in-depth look at the world of the British Caribbean in the 1810s, involving sugar, slaves and a healthy dose of terror. This might have worked as a Halloween episode, but I’m a week too late.

I plan to drop new episodes each week (if possible) on Sunday evening, though it will likely be Monday morning in most cases before it filters down to iTunes and the other podcast aggregators. In any event, I hope you enjoy Episode 2!

The image header and artwork for the Second Decade Podcast is copyright (C) 2016 by Sean Munger, all rights reserved. So is the podcast content itself.
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